Imlil

Imlil

Imlil is a small village in the high Atlas Mountains of Morocco located 1740 meters above sea level. A portrait of Imlil and the problems and prospects of Morocco's mountain populations appeared in 1984 in the book by James A. Miller called Imlil and published by Westview Press). It is close to the mountain Jebel Toubkal, the highest peak in Northern Africa. Imlil makes a good base for attempting to summit Toubkal.

Imlil is the center of mountain tourism in Morocco due to its unique position. From here, 90% of visitors head up to Toubkal, the highest mountain in Morocco. Imlil is the end of the tarmac road, and is a natural place to hire mountain guides and mules for the onward trek.

Imlil as a village is a relatively new creation. It was created to cater for the amount of tourists pouring through en route to Toubkal. The original communities still exist in the valleys around: Tamatert; Ait Souka; Tagadirt; Acheim; Taourirt n'Ait Mizane; Mzikene; and Arhrene.

Before the advent of mountain tourism, the Imlil area was well known for its walnuts, apples, and cherry production. While these are still important to the local economy, they have been eclipsed by tourism. Both mountain tourists and Moroccans come to Imli seeking a cool relief from the heat of the Haouz.

Information based on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imlil